Purpose Prize

Marc Freedman Portrait

The Latest from CoGenerate

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

I was thrilled when I heard about the new book, Why Aren’t We Doing This! Collaborating with Minors in Major Ways, written by Denise Webb, age 20, and Wendy Schaetzel Lesko, age 73, (both pictured above) and published by Youth Infusion, a clearinghouse co-founded by...

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Sunday’s show featured three big moments reminding us that music can be a bridge not only across race, culture, and genre, but also age. Tracy Chapman & Luke Combs. Much attention, rightfully, has gone to the duet between Tracy Chapman, who turns 60 next month,...

A New Chapter for the Encore Fellowships Program

A New Chapter for the Encore Fellowships Program

We’re excited to share the news that the Encore Fellowships program has moved to The Fedcap Group, a new home with the capacity, networks and drive to help the groundbreaking program expand dramatically.  Got questions? We’ve got answers. What’s The Fedcap Group? The...

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Dale Sims

CleanFish
Purpose Prize Fellow 2009

Sims connects grocery stores, restaurants, and consumers with salmon and other seafood raised and harvested in an environmentally friendly, sustainable fashion.

“If you don’t like the news, then go out and make some of your own. That’s what I vowed to do,” explains Sims, who left his job with a large seafood company to found an enterprise focused exclusively on artisan and sustainable seafood – CleanFish. His epiphany came after seeing a movie detailing the dangers to the ocean and to consumer health from over-fishing and from practices used by industrial-scale operations. Feeling remorse for being – as he saw it – part of the problem, Sims decided to be part of the solution. He ignored warnings from his former colleagues that he could never get a new company off the ground and founded the business with his partner, Tim O’Shea. They built CleanFish to yield a positive return on financial, social, and natural capital. Sims cold-called every fish dealer he knew and drove sustainably produced fish to local restaurants from the backseat of his car to create a base of suppliers and customers. The formula is simple: Support fisheries where wild fish are harvested responsibly; connect them with educated consumers; and build a new market of supply and demand based on sustainability. CleanFish’s annual sales have grown from $3 million in 2006 to $17 million in 2009.