Purpose Prize

Marc Freedman Portrait

The Latest from CoGenerate

Overheard on Text: Imposter Syndrome

Overheard on Text: Imposter Syndrome

As colleagues from different generations (x/millennial), we’ve been leading talks and workshops sharing our insights about working across generations – what we call “cogeneration.” As we plan, we’re usually texting furiously, sharing ideas and reflections. So we...

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

I was thrilled when I heard about the new book, Why Aren’t We Doing This! Collaborating with Minors in Major Ways, written by Denise Webb, age 20, and Wendy Schaetzel Lesko, age 73, (both pictured above) and published by Youth Infusion, a clearinghouse co-founded by...

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Sunday’s show featured three big moments reminding us that music can be a bridge not only across race, culture, and genre, but also age. Tracy Chapman & Luke Combs. Much attention, rightfully, has gone to the duet between Tracy Chapman, who turns 60 next month,...

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Eddie Kamae

Hawaiian Legacy
Purpose Prize Fellow 2006

Preserving and perpetuating the cultural heritage of Hawai'i

Eddie Kamae, now 79, was in his sixties when he began to make documentaries. A professional musician, he dove into filmmaking after being inspired by a 90-year-old traditional Hawaiian songwriter. In his film work, Kamae tells the stories of Hawaii and its people before the state’s rapid transition from an isolated agrarian community to a Western-influenced modern society. His goal is to pass on the traditional values, voices, and culture to younger generations. In his eight films, Kamae has captured the words, songs, expressions, and activities of more than 40 kupuna, or Hawaiian elders, the last living links to pre-modern Hawaiian life. The films have been shown at major film festivals in the United States and have been purchased by the state prison system for its rehabilitation program. Though 2.3 million people have seen his work, including 800,000 school children, Kamae works to make sure his films remain widely accessible and to preserve the irreplaceable materials entrusted to him by his subjects.