Purpose Prize

Marc Freedman Portrait

The Latest from CoGenerate

Overheard on Text: Imposter Syndrome

Overheard on Text: Imposter Syndrome

As colleagues from different generations (x/millennial), we’ve been leading talks and workshops sharing our insights about working across generations – what we call “cogeneration.” As we plan, we’re usually texting furiously, sharing ideas and reflections. So we...

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

I was thrilled when I heard about the new book, Why Aren’t We Doing This! Collaborating with Minors in Major Ways, written by Denise Webb, age 20, and Wendy Schaetzel Lesko, age 73, (both pictured above) and published by Youth Infusion, a clearinghouse co-founded by...

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Sunday’s show featured three big moments reminding us that music can be a bridge not only across race, culture, and genre, but also age. Tracy Chapman & Luke Combs. Much attention, rightfully, has gone to the duet between Tracy Chapman, who turns 60 next month,...

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Gerald Gray

Institute for Redress & Recovery, Santa Clara University
Purpose Prize Fellow 2008

Helping torture survivors achieve justice and peace.

In 1986, after years as a respected psychotherapist, Gerald Gray was stunned when one client, a refugee, recounted a harrowing story of seeing a photo at a friend’s house of a man who had tortured him. Gray was shocked to learn that torturers and other human rights abusers could immigrate to live freely in the United States. At 61, he founded organizations to bring them to justice and help their victims. Gray saw that he could help address the scourge of political torture by ending any hope torturers might have of finding safe haven, and by aiding recovery for the 500,000 torture victims living in the United States. With prominent human rights lawyers, he formed the Center for Justice & Accountability to track abusers and bring them to account. Then he co-launched the Institute for Redress and Recovery at Santa Clara University to give torture victims the legal and psychological help they need. Gray has aided over 4,000 torture survivors from more than 80 countries at three centers in California. He is now leveraging resources to provide support to victims overseas.  “We do not have to be bystanders. When I learned the numbers of [torture] survivors, I was absolutely certain of my late life’s work.”