Purpose Prize

Marc Freedman Portrait

The Latest from CoGenerate

Overheard on Text: Imposter Syndrome

Overheard on Text: Imposter Syndrome

As colleagues from different generations (x/millennial), we’ve been leading talks and workshops sharing our insights about working across generations – what we call “cogeneration.” As we plan, we’re usually texting furiously, sharing ideas and reflections. So we...

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

I was thrilled when I heard about the new book, Why Aren’t We Doing This! Collaborating with Minors in Major Ways, written by Denise Webb, age 20, and Wendy Schaetzel Lesko, age 73, (both pictured above) and published by Youth Infusion, a clearinghouse co-founded by...

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Sunday’s show featured three big moments reminding us that music can be a bridge not only across race, culture, and genre, but also age. Tracy Chapman & Luke Combs. Much attention, rightfully, has gone to the duet between Tracy Chapman, who turns 60 next month,...

*

June Barrett

The Crumley House Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center
Purpose Prize Fellow 2013

After her daughter suffered a traumatic brain injury, Barrett built a rehabilitation center in Tennessee to fill a crucial gap in care.

Each year, an estimated 1.7 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI), and 80% are released from the hospital. What happens once they leave?

As Tennessee real estate developer June Barrett discovered in 1981 when her then 14-year-old daughter Lori suffered a traumatic brain injury in a car accident that left her unable to walk, speak or eat, there were few rehabilitation or recovery treatments available. She met many families in the same situation.

Her purpose became to help not only Lori, but all victims of TBI. “I decided that I could make a plan and start a center to help the brain injured person have a second chance at life,” Barrett says. “Most people did not have resources for services, so a nonprofit program was the answer.”

In 1992, Barrett established the Crumley House Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center in Limestone, TN, to fill a crucial gap in rehabilitation and care. Upon retirement in 1998, she left her career as a realtor to fully devote herself to her encore work at Crumley House. Today, its day program offers classes in academic learning, computer training, physical training, household management, budgeting skills and personal hygiene. A residential living center supports 23 residents with 24/7 care. In the past decade, Crumley House has served over 3,000 brain injured members and their families in nine Tennessee counties.

“I have been able to pull a community of volunteers together under my Christian leadership to develop a one-of-a-kind brain injury program, giving a second chance at life,” she says of her encore career. “We have made a big difference in many lives. Isn’t that what life is all about?”