Purpose Prize

Marc Freedman Portrait

The Latest from CoGenerate

Overheard on Text: Imposter Syndrome

Overheard on Text: Imposter Syndrome

As colleagues from different generations (x/millennial), we’ve been leading talks and workshops sharing our insights about working across generations – what we call “cogeneration.” As we plan, we’re usually texting furiously, sharing ideas and reflections. So we...

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

This Cogenerational Pair Calls for ‘Radical Inclusion’ of Youth

I was thrilled when I heard about the new book, Why Aren’t We Doing This! Collaborating with Minors in Major Ways, written by Denise Webb, age 20, and Wendy Schaetzel Lesko, age 73, (both pictured above) and published by Youth Infusion, a clearinghouse co-founded by...

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Music Is Having a Moment — And It’s a Cogenerational One.

Sunday’s show featured three big moments reminding us that music can be a bridge not only across race, culture, and genre, but also age. Tracy Chapman & Luke Combs. Much attention, rightfully, has gone to the duet between Tracy Chapman, who turns 60 next month,...

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Charlie Stayton
(1943-2008)

The Witness Project
Purpose Prize Fellow 2006

Increasing breast and cervical cancer awareness among African American women.

A survivor of cervical cancer, Charlie Stayton, 63, joined the Witness Project as a volunteer in 1990 and was later hired as director of the organization. The Witness Project is a breast and cervical cancer education and outreach program targeting African American, minority, and medically underserved women in the Delta region of Arkansas.Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the United States, and yet many women delay screenings for a range of reasons – limited knowledge of the disease, misunderstanding of appropriate screening frequency, restricted access to screening and treatment, and lack of insurance coverage. Volunteers for the Witness Project visit women in African American churches, community centers, and work sites and teach them about the benefits of early detection through self exams and mammography. To facilitate screening appointments, program volunteers connect the women with child care and transportation. Free and low cost screenings as well as cancer treatment are also made available to program participants. Under Stayton’s direction, the Witness Project has expanded to serve thousands of women in Arkansas each year and has inspired a network of 33 similar programs in 22 states.